health

Low Back Pain

Stand up, bend forward at the waist, and try to touch your fingertips to your toes without bending your knees. If you can’t, then your hamstrings are tighter than they should be. (1).jpg

The hamstrings are a group of 3 muscles located on the back of femur or thigh.  The muscles connect from the buttocks area of the pelvis to the backsides of the lower leg.  This allows the hamstring muscle group to bend the knee as well as extend the hip (bringing the thigh behind you).  Normally the spine is set in such a way that there is a small curve in the low back.  This is because the backside of the pelvis is slightly higher than the front.  When the muscles in the back of the thigh are too tight they can pull the back side of the pelvis downward.  This can be demonstrated by tightening the buttocks or pushing the hips forward.  This downward pull of the pelvis can cause a flattening of the back which puts the spine at a disadvantage when it comes to the ability to hold your body upright against gravity.  The constant pulling of the shortened muscles increases pressure on the bones of the spine as well as adds strain to muscles because they have to work harder to hold the body up against gravity.  When this happens for a prolonged time, the muscles in the low back become weak and start to fatigue or get tired sooner.  The muscular imbalances can cause pain in the low back because of these reasons.  An example of a situation in which this can occur can be seen in an individual who sits at a desk for prolonged periods of time without proper back support and/or posture. – See more at: http://www.totalperformancept.com/2012/11/29/tight-hamstrings-can-be-a-major-contributor-to-low-back-pain/#sthash.4bzZEKdB.dpuf

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